Oncotype DX Breast Recurrence Score

 

Quotes from the above video are referenced at the bottom of this page

The Oncotype DX® Breast Cancer Assay provides patients and their physicians with individualised information about their breast cancer to guide decisions on how to proceed with treatment.

When someone is diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer, the first step is usually surgery to remove the tumour. The next step is to estimate the likelihood of the cancer coming back (recurrence), as well as consider how to proceed with treatment.

Medical oncologists look at pathological factors such as the size and grade of the tumour, the tumour’s hormone receptor and HER2 status, and whether the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, to estimate the likelihood that the cancer will return and consider how to proceed with treatment.

In endocrine receptor-positive, early, invasive breast cancer, hormonal therapy is usually considered a standard treatment. However, for these patients, the benefit of adding chemotherapy to hormone therapy is unclear. Traditional pathological factors often do not provide enough information to assist in the estimation of recurrence (prognosis) or prediction of the likely benefit of chemotherapy.1-4

The Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay is a unique, genomic test that provides specific information about an individual’s tumour. The Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay is performed on breast cancer tissue saved from surgery. The test examines the unique ‘gene expression profile’ of a patient's tumour to provide more precise information on the likelihood that their breast cancer will recur and importantly, provides information on whether chemotherapy is likely to reduce the chance that the cancer will return.1-4

The Oncotype DX assay analyses the expression of 21 genes to provide a Recurrence Score® result unique to each patient.  The Recurrence Score result is a number between 0 and 100.

Women with low Recurrence Score results (<18) have a lower risk that their cancer may return, though it does not mean there is no chance that the breast cancer will return. Importantly, a low Recurrence Score result indicates that the addition of chemotherapy would have little to no benefit in reducing the chance of the breast cancer recurring.2,3

Women with high Recurrence Score results (≥31) have a greater chance that their breast cancer may return, though it does not mean that the cancer will definitely come back. Importantly, women with high Recurrence Score results, are likely to receive a significant benefit from chemotherapy; the addition of chemotherapy is likely to reduce the risk of the cancer returning.2,3

For women with an intermediate Recurrence Score (18-30), other factors will need to be considered in consultation with their doctor to determine the degree of benefit from chemotherapy and how to proceed with treatment.2,3

The Oncotype DX test also provides additional information such as the levels of oestrogen, progesterone and HER2 expression in the tumour, which further guides individualised treatment planning.

Major international treatment guidelines have all incorporated the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay to guide chemotherapy treatment decisions for patients with early-stage, hormone receptor-positive, HER2-negative invasive breast cancer.5-8

Who Might Benefit from the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay?

The Oncotype DX breast cancer assay can be used by all patients newly diagnosed with early stage, invasive breast cancer who are:

  • Node-negative or node-positive (cancer has spread to no more than 3 lymph nodes)
  • Oestrogen receptor (ER) positive and
  • Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) negative

Breast Surgeon Jane O’Brien discusses Oncotype DX

Respected Australian breast cancer surgeon Jane O’Brien discusses the Oncotype DX breast cancer assay.

Oncotype DX Stories

Susie’s Story

Mother of three, Susie Nassour, was diagnosed with breast cancer just days before her 50th birthday. She had a 25 mm tumour and cancer was detected in one of her lymph nodes. She was keen to avoid chemotherapy, if possible.

Deb’s Story

Deb Force was diagnosed with breast cancer after routine screening. While she could not feel a lump, doctors discovered a large, 45 mm tumour. Despite the size of her tumour, Deb was hopeful she could avoid chemotherapy.

Mary’s Story

Mary Miras was vigilant about regular breast self examination. After discovering a lump, it turned out to be a 27 mm, grade 3 tumour. Cancer cells were also found in one of the lymph nodes under her arm. However, she was keen to avoid chemotherapy, if her doctor thought this was safe.

Wendy’s Story

59 year old Wendy Dunstone felt fitter than she had ever been when diagnosed with breast cancer in February 2015. Like many other women, she was keen to avoid chemotherapy – particularly because she had seen the impact of this treatment on a close relative.

Further Information for Patients

Oncotype DX Patient Brochure

Links


www.oncotypedx.com
www.mytreatmentdecision.com
www.bcna.org.au/new-diagnosis/treatment/chemotherapy

 

Further Information for Health Care Professionals

Sample Oncotype DX Reports

Node-Negative Report

Node-Positive Report (1-3 nodes)

Node-Positive Report (4 or more nodes)

Ordering Oncotype DX in Australia

Please download step-by-step instructions for ordering:

How to Order Oncotype DX in Australia

Please download the required forms:    

Requisition Form

Payment Form

Ordering Oncotype DX in New Zealand

Please download step-by-step instructions for ordering:

How to Order Oncotype DX in New Zealand

For further information on how to order Oncotype DX, please contact Specialised Therapeutics Australia on:
Phone: 1300 798 820 or +61 3 9859 1493
Email: oncotypedx@specialisedtherapeutics.com.au
Fax: 1800 798 829 or +61 3 9859 6950

Further information regarding the Oncotype DX Breast Cancer Assay can also be found on the Oncotype DX website, hosted by Genomic Health, Inc.

References:
1. Paik S et al. NEJM 2004; 351: 2817-26   2. Albain KS et al. Lancet Oncol 2010; 11: 55-65   3. Paik S et al. J Clin Oncol. 2006; 24: 3726-34   4. Dowsett M et al. J Clin Oncol 2010; 28:1829-34   5. Harris LN, et al. J Clin Oncol. 2016   6. NCCN Guidelines Breast Cancer Version 2.2016   7. Senkus E, et al. Ann Oncol. 2015; 26:v8-v30   8. Coates AS, et al. Ann Oncol. 2015; 26:1533-1546